PC Games 2015

2014 is dead—nyoooo! It was pretty good, but it could do nothing to halt the unstoppable wave of new games 2015 will bring. There are talky games, shooty games, driving games, games that let you bake bread and games that let you become bread.

By 1990 DOS comprised 65% of the computer-game market, with the Amiga at 10%; all other computers, including the Apple Macintosh, were below 10% and declining. Although both Apple and IBM tried to avoid customers associating their products with “game machine”s, the latter acknowledged that VGA, audio, and joystick options for its PS/1 computer were popular.[22] In 1991, id Software produced an early first-person shooter, Hovertank 3D, which was the company’s first in their line of highly influential games in the genre. There were also several other companies that produced early first-person shooters, such as Arsys Software’s Star Cruiser,[23] which featured fully 3D polygonal graphics in 1988,[24] and Accolade’s Day of the Viper in 1989. Id Software went on to develop Wolfenstein 3D in 1992, which helped to popularize the genre, kick-starting a genre that would become one of the highest-selling in modern times.[25] The game was originally distributed through the shareware distribution model, allowing players to try a limited part of the game for free but requiring payment to play the rest, and represented one of the first uses of texture mapping graphics in a popular game, along with Ultima Underworld.[26]

In December 1992 Computer Gaming World reported that DOS accounted for 82% of computer-game sales in 1991, compared to Macintosh’s 8% and Amiga’s 5%. In response to a reader’s challenge to find a DOS game that played better than the Amiga version the magazine cited Wing Commander and Civilization, and added that “The heavy MS-DOS emphasis in CGW merely reflects the realities of the market”.[27] A self-reported Computer Gaming World survey in April 1993 similarly found that 91% of readers primarily used IBM PCs and compatibles for gaming, compared to 6% for Amiga, 3% for Macintosh, and 1% for Atari ST,[28] while a Software Publishing Association study found that 74% of personal computers were IBMs or compatible, 10% Macintosh, 7% Apple II, and 8% other. 51% of IBM or compatible had 386 or faster CPUs.[19] By 1992 DOS games such as Links supported Super VGA graphics.[29] While leading Sega and Nintendo console systems kept their CPU speed at 3–7 MHz, the 486 PC processor ran much faster, allowing it to perform many more calculations per second. So join the elite race of PC gamers and discover an experience unlike any other!